Falcon Residency

Artists in the cabins » Rachel Schappert

Photos by Emily Christie and Kyle Schappert

Last week, amongst the gorgeous fall weather and bright orange colours, we welcomed Winnipeg based artist Rachel Schappert to the resort. Rachel's current art practice involves themes that explore the interconnected relationship between people and nature.

rachel-20.jpg

Rachel set up shop on the High Lake warm up shelter, and spent the week building on-site sculptures which incorporate, decorate, accentuate, and play with the natural features of the sweet little site hidden along the High Lake trail.

The sculptures are hidden in and amongst the trees and rocks of the site. A delight for hikers to enjoy and explore. Each piece is full of details to be discovered, such as the single juniper berry in each copper and glass capsule on the piece, picked from the forest in which the sculpture now sits.

The High Lake shelter served as Rachel's indoor studio space, providing an escape from the wind and storage for her tools.

Here’s a view of one of the installations on a Jack pine tree I was collaborating with near a warm-up shack on a short trail that leads to a gorgeous lookout point at Falcon Trails.
...
Whether viewed as a window, portal, the trees aura or its eye... for me weaving is symbolic for interconnectivity in many ways. The pieces change with what is reflected in the centre. We may see ourselves mirrored in the tree or we may peer away from ourselves and view the forest with tree branches swaying in the wind with a vast backdrop of sky.
...
Either way I perceive the interplay of reflections as weaving invisible threads that connect nature and human viewers, as well as creatures that might interact with them. I watched various insects and even a squirrel pay interest and it was a delightful experience! ...
❦ ✨ ❦

Also, I placed bits of reindeer lichen from the landscape in each copper piece encapsulating and radiating the energy of the boreal.
— Rachel describing some of the inspiration and emotions behind in forest sculptures.

Some videos Rachel captured which demonstrate the amazing light interplay between her pieces and the surrounding environment.


During her residency, Rachel's brother Kyle Schappert, who just so happens to be a renowned photographer, came out for a visit and also snapped a few shots to capture Rachel's beautiful piece:

The Mahigan cabin at High Lake, where Rachel stayed during her residency. Photo by Rachel's talented brother Kyle Schappert.

The Mahigan cabin at High Lake, where Rachel stayed during her residency. Photo by Rachel's talented brother Kyle Schappert.



It was an honour having Rachel out to Falcon Trails, and we couldn't be more excited about the gorgeous addition her art makes to the beautiful High Lake warm up shack site. Definatly worth checking out.

Rachel's sculptures will remain in place at the warm up shack. Be sure to hike out and check them out! They will remain in place in the winter, but might be a little harder to find under the snow.

You can check out the trail there (look for the warm up shelter point) on the trailforks map:

High Lake service trail on Trailforks.com